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Relationships in the Digital Age: An interview with Alexandra Solomon, PhD

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On Thursday, April 30th, The Family Institute will present our Circle of Knowledge event Dating, Mating & Marrying in the Age of Social Media. This event, presented by Alexandra Solomon, PhD, will explore how our digital age has added enormous complexity to relational communication and romance. Dr. Solomon will help individuals and couples learn how to use social media to enhance and expand their love lives, not replace it.

To gear up for this exciting event, held at Microsoft’s office in downtown Chicago at 6:30 p.m., we sat down with Dr. Solomon to get a sneak peak at the sort of issues she’ll be tackling in her presentation. Read a few of her responses below, and visit our website to register for the event.

 

TFI: Has our digital age impacted the way interact with romantic partners?

AS: Our digital age has impacted how we interact with romantic partners in complex ways that range from the subtle to the profound.  And I think we are only just beginning to wrap our minds around these changes.  It is difficult to find a facet of our intimate relationships that the digital age has not touched.  Everything from seeking a partner using online medium, to formalizing commitment to that relationship in a series of status changes, to shaping our definitions and experiences of fidelity, monogamy, and betrayal (How much texting is too much texting?  Can I be Facebook friends with my ex?).

 

TFI: Technology moves at such a quick pace—how does that pace compare to that of forming a romantic relationship and/or intimacy?

AS: Our relationship with technology is marked by our expectation that we can have exactly what we want, exactly when we want it, preferably at lightning fast speed.  However, intimacy requires an entirely different energy.  Trust must build over time through, as M. Scott Peck says, “a relationship of constancy.”  Technology also offers us such quantity, such volume.  Building a romantic relationship requires less—less distraction, more mindful presence in this moment with another.  Neither of these energies is good or bad per se, but we need to be careful not to bring what we expect from our technology into our expectations of our intimate relationships.

 

TFI: Are there advantages to technology/social media/the digital world? How can these things positively impact relationships and/or dating?

 

For sure!  I am confident that online dating is here to stay.  Many people report positive experiences and create amazing relationships with people they would not have otherwise had the chance to meet.  And it invites all of us to elevate our games, so to speak.  To be really conscious about WHY am I selecting this media avenue right now?  What is my intention?  We are invited to practice discernment and to observe ourselves.  All of that is very positive.

 

Dating Mating & Marrying in the Age of Social Media will feature Dr. Alexandra Solomon addressing these questions and more. The event, held at no cost at Microsoft’s downtown Chicago headquarters, will focus on how the digital age impacts our relationships — for better and for worse.

Find more event details below, and visit our website for more information.

Dating, Mating & Marrying in the Age of Social Media

Presented by Alexandra Solomon, PhD

Thursday, April 30, 2015
6:30 p.m. registration, 7:00 p.m. presentation
Microsoft, 200 E. Randolph, Chicago

Free of charge, space limited
Register online today!
Deadline to register: April 23, 2015

For more information, call 312-609-5300, ext. 480 or email cok@family-institute.org.

 

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